Posts Tagged: Frederick Rolfe

15 books for 2015

Bricktop, Baron Corvo and Bertolt Brecht join a cast of…oh, about two dozen

15 books for 2015

Bricktop, Baron Corvo and Bertolt Brecht join a cast of…oh, about two dozen

Pages: The Play of Hadrian VII

Frederick Rolfe and his pontifical delusions

Pages: The Play of Hadrian VII

Frederick Rolfe and his pontifical delusions

Corvo’s cult century

The greatest asshole who ever lived?

Corvo’s cult century

The greatest asshole who ever lived?

Doubles: R. H. Benson

“He did not exactly aspire to actual creation, but he certainly nourished the notion that several serious mistakes had resulted from his absence during the events described in the first chapter of Genesis.”

Doubles: R. H. Benson

“He did not exactly aspire to actual creation, but he certainly nourished the notion that several serious mistakes had resulted from his absence during the events described in the first chapter of Genesis.”

Doubles: Frederick Rolfe

“He had so completely accepted Chris’s poses in the place of Chris’s soul, that he did not dare to enquire after the latter. They were as formidable footmen who always said ‘Not at home’ with an air of personal grievance.”

Doubles: Frederick Rolfe

“He had so completely accepted Chris’s poses in the place of Chris’s soul, that he did not dare to enquire after the latter. They were as formidable footmen who always said ‘Not at home’ with an air of personal grievance.”

Pearls: Frederick Rolfe

“What do I care for the world, that I should plane my prominences down to fit its narrow groove?”

Pearls: Frederick Rolfe

“What do I care for the world, that I should plane my prominences down to fit its narrow groove?”

Pages: Frederick Rolfe’s Reviews of Unwritten Books

These articles, written around the same time as Hadrian the Seventh (1903/04) come as a complete revelation. Where Hadrian was weighed down by Rolfe’s sense of aggrieved entitlement, these Reviews are light in the best possible sense, borne aloft on wit and invention.

Pages: Frederick Rolfe’s Reviews of Unwritten Books

These articles, written around the same time as Hadrian the Seventh (1903/04) come as a complete revelation. Where Hadrian was weighed down by Rolfe’s sense of aggrieved entitlement, these Reviews are light in the best possible sense, borne aloft on wit and invention.

Strange Flowers guide to London: part 1

There are infinite ways to dissect London, endless psychogeographical narratives which can be overlaid on the city’s map. This is an account of absence as much as presence, but let’s think of it as a stroll which gives us a chance to chat about our favourite freaks.

Strange Flowers guide to London: part 1

There are infinite ways to dissect London, endless psychogeographical narratives which can be overlaid on the city’s map. This is an account of absence as much as presence, but let’s think of it as a stroll which gives us a chance to chat about our favourite freaks.

Benevolent deity

Rolfe became the archetype of a semi-forgotten literary character, stuffed, labelled and musty in the glass cases of the antiquarian, lauded by a small but fervent group of admirers. It is no coincidence that his three major biographers to date have been bibliophiles.

Benevolent deity

Rolfe became the archetype of a semi-forgotten literary character, stuffed, labelled and musty in the glass cases of the antiquarian, lauded by a small but fervent group of admirers. It is no coincidence that his three major biographers to date have been bibliophiles.

Papal bull

You’ll search Vatican annals in vain for a reference to Pope Hadrian VII. There’s no marble effigy of him in the great, gaudy expanse of St Peter’s, no tomb thronged with credulous cripples; he’s not even enrolled among the bad-boy anti-popes. Hadrian, you see, was the fantasy projection of one Frederick Rolfe, otherwise known as Baron Corvo…

Papal bull

You’ll search Vatican annals in vain for a reference to Pope Hadrian VII. There’s no marble effigy of him in the great, gaudy expanse of St Peter’s, no tomb thronged with credulous cripples; he’s not even enrolled among the bad-boy anti-popes. Hadrian, you see, was the fantasy projection of one Frederick Rolfe, otherwise known as Baron Corvo…

Concerning the Eccentricities of Ronald Firbank

Firbank, it seems, was born blushing; his associates never fail to mention his social awkwardness, particularly the incessant fluttering of hands and the hysterical laughter which would periodically erupt, leaving him incapable of completing an anecdote.

Concerning the Eccentricities of Ronald Firbank

Firbank, it seems, was born blushing; his associates never fail to mention his social awkwardness, particularly the incessant fluttering of hands and the hysterical laughter which would periodically erupt, leaving him incapable of completing an anecdote.