Posts Tagged: Joséphin Péladan

17-plus books for 2017

Dead poets, nude dancers, good bohemians, mystical Symbolists, jaded aristocrats, queer courtiers and blind men at play in a realm of dreams and voodoo

17-plus books for 2017

Dead poets, nude dancers, good bohemians, mystical Symbolists, jaded aristocrats, queer courtiers and blind men at play in a realm of dreams and voodoo

Royally buzzed

“Even the mummies stand up and walk when they drink Vin Mariani!”

Royally buzzed

“Even the mummies stand up and walk when they drink Vin Mariani!”

Dress-down Friday: Joséphin Péladan

“Every exclusively masculine figure is lacking in grace, every exclusively feminine one is lacking in strength.”

Dress-down Friday: Joséphin Péladan

“Every exclusively masculine figure is lacking in grace, every exclusively feminine one is lacking in strength.”

Dress-down Friday: Mathilde de Morny

It was as a man that she stole a society playboy’s mistress and as a man that she dueled him. She won, and to crown his humiliation ripped open her shirt and exposed her breasts; he had been bested by a mere woman.

Dress-down Friday: Mathilde de Morny

It was as a man that she stole a society playboy’s mistress and as a man that she dueled him. She won, and to crown his humiliation ripped open her shirt and exposed her breasts; he had been bested by a mere woman.

Pearls: Joséphin Péladan

“Making the invisible visible: that is the true purpose of art and its only reason for existence.”

Pearls: Joséphin Péladan

“Making the invisible visible: that is the true purpose of art and its only reason for existence.”

La Marquise de Sade

Mathilde de Morny’s scandalous life and aristocratic background proved an irresistible combination for contemporary writers; she appears thinly disguised in numerous works of fiction, though often the portrayal owed more to the author’s projection than the marquise herself.

La Marquise de Sade

Mathilde de Morny’s scandalous life and aristocratic background proved an irresistible combination for contemporary writers; she appears thinly disguised in numerous works of fiction, though often the portrayal owed more to the author’s projection than the marquise herself.

A sâr is born

Joséphin Péladan was a keen self-publicist, describing himself as “the sandwich man of the Beyond”, and the opening night of the Salon des Rose+Croix in 1892 was mobbed by punters just as keen to lay eyes on the extraordinary “Sâr” as the work of such artists as Jean Delville.

A sâr is born

Joséphin Péladan was a keen self-publicist, describing himself as “the sandwich man of the Beyond”, and the opening night of the Salon des Rose+Croix in 1892 was mobbed by punters just as keen to lay eyes on the extraordinary “Sâr” as the work of such artists as Jean Delville.