Posts Tagged: Joseph Roth

22 books for 2022

We’ve got bad gays, can-can dancers and pataphysicians, we’ve got a Black Pope, an Expressionist Joan of Arc and the Last Emperor of Mexico. Won’t you join us?

22 books for 2022

We’ve got bad gays, can-can dancers and pataphysicians, we’ve got a Black Pope, an Expressionist Joan of Arc and the Last Emperor of Mexico. Won’t you join us?

Secret Satan, 2021 part 1

From Romanian avant-garde Elvis to all the Swedish anarchist Sufi Post-Impressionsists you can imagine

Secret Satan, 2021 part 1

From Romanian avant-garde Elvis to all the Swedish anarchist Sufi Post-Impressionsists you can imagine

21 books for 2021

A selection of works with which to while away your second or third lockdown.

21 books for 2021

A selection of works with which to while away your second or third lockdown.

20 books for 2020

In which we visit Rogomelec and Sealand, the castle of truth and a fern-loved gully

20 books for 2020

In which we visit Rogomelec and Sealand, the castle of truth and a fern-loved gully

Looking ahead

A look ahead at some volumes of interest scheduled to appear in 2012, including works by or about Joseph Roth, Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, Aleister Crowley, Isabelle Eberhardt, Ronald Firbank, M.P. Shiel and Count Eric Stenbock, as well as a biography of Herbert Huncke.

Looking ahead

A look ahead at some volumes of interest scheduled to appear in 2012, including works by or about Joseph Roth, Anita Berber & Sebastian Droste, Aleister Crowley, Isabelle Eberhardt, Ronald Firbank, M.P. Shiel and Count Eric Stenbock, as well as a biography of Herbert Huncke.

Strange Flowers guide to Berlin: part 3

The retro-revellers at Bohème Sauvage are responding to a particular idea of Weimar Berlin, a fragile, frantic golden age of sexual license and social mobility, lewd and doomed. The undying allure of the Weimar Berlin evoked by Isherwood’s books ensures that the reality of the city in that era can never be divorced from its fictional echoes.

Strange Flowers guide to Berlin: part 3

The retro-revellers at Bohème Sauvage are responding to a particular idea of Weimar Berlin, a fragile, frantic golden age of sexual license and social mobility, lewd and doomed. The undying allure of the Weimar Berlin evoked by Isherwood’s books ensures that the reality of the city in that era can never be divorced from its fictional echoes.