Posts Tagged: Brian Howard

Strange Flowers guide to London: part 2

Fitzrovia was a stone’s throw from Bloomsbury but a world away in temperament. According to the Times Literary Supplement, Fitzrovia was “a world of outsiders, down-and-outs, drunks, sensualists, homosexuals and eccentrics”. In short, the spiritual home of Strange Flowers.

Strange Flowers guide to London: part 2

Fitzrovia was a stone’s throw from Bloomsbury but a world away in temperament. According to the Times Literary Supplement, Fitzrovia was “a world of outsiders, down-and-outs, drunks, sensualists, homosexuals and eccentrics”. In short, the spiritual home of Strange Flowers.

“A huge old baby vulture”

“Eccentricity is not […] a form of madness. It is often a kind of innocent pride, and the man of genius and the aristocrat are frequently regarded as eccentrics because genius and aristocrat are entirely unafraid of and uninfluenced by the opinions and vagaries of the crowd.”

“A huge old baby vulture”

“Eccentricity is not […] a form of madness. It is often a kind of innocent pride, and the man of genius and the aristocrat are frequently regarded as eccentrics because genius and aristocrat are entirely unafraid of and uninfluenced by the opinions and vagaries of the crowd.”

The kindest poison

I have two loves, and one is the terrible night/the cannibal carnation, the soft storm/beautiful, blind and black, invisible, alive and dead/the carnation face, the lullaby, the kindest poison, the prison.

The kindest poison

I have two loves, and one is the terrible night/the cannibal carnation, the soft storm/beautiful, blind and black, invisible, alive and dead/the carnation face, the lullaby, the kindest poison, the prison.

Dress-down Friday: Brian Howard

While the young, waspish, fabulous Howard lived on in print, the real Howard had to somehow make his way in the world. It was a disappointing journey, as the title of Marie-Jaqueline Lancaster’s biography Portrait of a Failure makes clear.

Dress-down Friday: Brian Howard

While the young, waspish, fabulous Howard lived on in print, the real Howard had to somehow make his way in the world. It was a disappointing journey, as the title of Marie-Jaqueline Lancaster’s biography Portrait of a Failure makes clear.