Posts Tagged: Baron de Redé

Paris is burning

…or at least the Hôtel Lambert, once home to the Baron de Redé.

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Paris is burning

…or at least the Hôtel Lambert, once home to the Baron de Redé.

‘Hundreds of pages of nonsense?’

…or, the autobiography of the Baron de Redé, subject of a lecture by the book’s editor, Hugo Vickers.

‘Hundreds of pages of nonsense?’

…or, the autobiography of the Baron de Redé, subject of a lecture by the book’s editor, Hugo Vickers.

Not entirely frivolous

“I have never claimed to do other than love beauty and luxury…”

Not entirely frivolous

“I have never claimed to do other than love beauty and luxury…”

The Marquis

Among the guests at the 18th century-themed ball were “50 princes, 35 marquesses, 95 counts, 20 dukes”, a collision of cluelessness and noblesse of a kind not seen since Louis XVI opened his Filofax on 14 July 1789 and jotted down “rien”.

The Marquis

Among the guests at the 18th century-themed ball were “50 princes, 35 marquesses, 95 counts, 20 dukes”, a collision of cluelessness and noblesse of a kind not seen since Louis XVI opened his Filofax on 14 July 1789 and jotted down “rien”.

The baron’s balls

The Baron de Redé was one of the city’s great hosts, standing in a tradition of party-givers strung across 20th century Paris like fairy lights: Étienne de Beaumont, George de Cuevas, Charles de Beistegui, Marie-Laure de Noailles. Redé knew them all, and took notes.

The baron’s balls

The Baron de Redé was one of the city’s great hosts, standing in a tradition of party-givers strung across 20th century Paris like fairy lights: Étienne de Beaumont, George de Cuevas, Charles de Beistegui, Marie-Laure de Noailles. Redé knew them all, and took notes.

At home with the Baron de Redé

In the 21st century Redé had himself become something of a museum piece, remnant of a vanished milieu for whom a well-laid table was the greatest good to which humanity could aspire. “Most of the world moves too fast for hand-made shoes, and elegant luncheons,” he reflected sadly, before dying in 2004.

At home with the Baron de Redé

In the 21st century Redé had himself become something of a museum piece, remnant of a vanished milieu for whom a well-laid table was the greatest good to which humanity could aspire. “Most of the world moves too fast for hand-made shoes, and elegant luncheons,” he reflected sadly, before dying in 2004.